UX Scotland 2018: day 2 takeaways

A summary of day two of UX Scotland 2018.

Day 2 Speakers

Claire’s session slides

Aaron’s session slides

Chris’ session slides

Chris and Anya’s session slides

Michael’s session slides

Sarah’s session slides

Jesmond’s session slides

Jessica’s session slides


Systems, discontinuities and thinking beyond UI: key questions for designing connected products

Claire’s keynote focused around how to design for the Internet of Things (IoT).

In 2015 the IoT was quite high on the Gartner Magic Quadrant; by 2016 it had its own hype quadrant.

When thinking about connected products, things that often come to mind are thermostats or similar devices, web or mobile apps for remotely managing and controlling these devices, and personal assistant devices (such as Alexa).

Connected things challenge the nature of ownership. Security is a serious concern.

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Designing interconnected devices in isolation won’t provide a seamless experience for the whole system.

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Using a Google Design Sprint as a product superpower

Aaron took us through his journey trying out different Sprint styles from the Google Design Sprint Toolkit and the lessons him and his team learned in the process.

Different types of Google Sprints:
. A normal sprint
. Back to back sprints
. The sprintless sprint
. The day sprint
. The half day sprint
. Mini sprints
. Mega sprints
. The 60 minute sprint

Lessons learned:

. Sprints don’t have to be done by the book.
. Sprints don’t solve everything.
. Sprints weren’t about building a product but building a global team.
. Sprints are useful for product ideation and can be modified for problem, time, and cost.

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Practising creativity

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The Lost Art of Task Modelling

Jesmond started her talk on task modelling with the example of ATM machines: it was found that people often left their cards behind. A change in the way the task of withdrawing money was designed, fixed this issue. The task went from ‘Cash machine -> money -> card’ to ‘Cash machine -> card -> money’.

A product should be designed to the way users already work. This can only be achieved by understanding user needs.

How to go about task modelling:

1. understand your users’ tasks and needs
2. identify common steps (order of steps, words used, etc)
3. boxes, arrows, lines -> represent the task in a diagram format

 

 

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Full stories

Gregg told us some examples on how taking the time to understand the full story of a user need, can make all the difference when designing the right experience for that user. One example was the case of his wife’s cancer diagnosis and how a 2 hour interview with a dedicated doctor made all the difference in ensuring the right treatments were prescribed to her.

The bottom line is that, in order to design efficient products and services, we need to understand not only the people we’re designing for, but also their world and their context.

Wisdom + Data + Context = That’s how you create meaningful stories.

Let’s talk about sex and gender – working together to get the question right

Jane’s lightning talk is summarised in ther blog Sex and/or gender — working together to get the question right.

https://twitter.com/JacquiDDavidson/status/1007282920086753280
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